The Road to “Teaching-Composition-Writing-on-the-Screen” What It takes to Get There…

Suriati Abas, Indiana University

Abstract

What’s down the road to “Teaching-Composition-Writing-on-the-Screen”? Have you ever thought about, or perhaps, driven on this path? Honestly, there isn’t any straight route to get there but it’s worth exploring. For decades, the benefits to L2 writing with the use of technology have been noted; offering “a range of informational, communicative, and publishing tools, now potentially at the fingertips of every student,” along with the importance of using it (Warschauer & Healey, 1998).

In fact, with new technologies entering into the scene, educators have to adopt “evolutionary roles” (Haas, 1996) to keep up with the times. Yet, how many of us are geared up to change our mindset, using tools that we’ve never tried? It might seem daunting to prepare students for experiences that we’ve never had as a student. If that sounds familiar, take a step back and ask yourself, “Have I equipped my students with literacies of the future?” In this short presentation, I offer an autoethnographic account of my personal trajectory as an associate instructor who advocates technoGOGY – a term that I’ve coined to describe my efforts at integrating emerging technologies to my pedagogy. I also tell the story of how I’ve reconceptualized a composition classroom that meets face-to-face thrice a week, without using pen-and-paper. What are the possible gains and losses of this approach for L2 undergraduates? Join me for an online discussion in the symposium to understand what it takes to get there…

Presenters
Suriati Abas

Associate Instructor, Department of English;
Phd candidate, Literacy, Culture & Language Education
Indiana University

sabas@umail.iu.edu

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a hybrid symposium on research and practice

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